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Cantonese Movies To Be Screened At National Museum Of Singapore

7. Night at the Museum (2006) Most federal museum workers will be sent home. These empty museums are bad news if youre employed in one. Somewhat better news if youre on display in one, as we learned from this comedy adventure hit starring Ben Stiller as a night security guard at the Museum of Natural History. 8. Outbreak (1995) If you credit some of the more alarmist predictions, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would be severely limited in investigating disease outbreaks in a government shutdown. Heaven forbid an outbreak of Ebola-like virus dramatized in this Dustin Hoffman-Rene Russo movie. 9. North by Northwest (1959) Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint wouldnt be allowed anywhere near Lincolns Nose on Mount Rushmore with the Park Service folks twiddling their thumbs at home in a shutdown. 10. Mr.

11, 2013 photo, Kirk Blankenship, Electronic Resources Librarian for Seattle Public Libraries, poses for a photo as he holds a tablet with the website for streaming-media company Hoopla, which the library is using to offer patrons free access to streaming movies, music, and audiobooks. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren) Story Photos Streaming Movies Libraries SEATTLE (AP) – There’s a new source to stream movies and other digital content, and it’s not a tech company with tens of thousands of titles. It’s something more familiar, and might even be just down the street: the public library. Often thought of as stodgy brick-and-mortar havens for bibliophiles, libraries are trying out a new service that allows patrons to check out streaming movies, music, TV shows and audiobooks from anywhere they want. It works similarly to Netflix: Through an app on a tablet or a browser on a personal computer, users can peruse dozens of movies and click on a film to “borrow” it. The content starts streaming, for free. While libraries are already loaning e-books, the move to streaming is part of a larger shift for them to remain relevant in a digital world. Libraries are “meeting patrons where they want to access content,” said Kirk Blankenship, Electronic Resources Librarian for Seattle Public Libraries, which is using the service called Hoopla. The service, from Ohio-based Midwest Tape, LLC, is also being used in Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, Topeka, Kan., and several others towns and cities nationwide. Hoopla launched in full in May with 20 library systems. As of early September, there are about 220,000 people using the app, said Michael Manon, Hoopla’s brand manager. The goal is to reach 100 library systems by year’s end. Libraries have always been a source of audiovisual entertainment. A 2012 Pew Research Center survey found that among patrons 16 years old and older, 40 percent visited libraries to borrow movies.

Now at your Seattle library: Streaming movies, music

Come October 10, 15 iconic Cantonese movies from the 1950s and 1960s will be screened at the National Museum of Singapore. PHOTOS Hong Kong actor Patrick Tse in the 1966 Cantonese film “The Dreadnaught”. During the 1950s and 1960s, Tse was one of the most popular leading men in Cantonese film in Hong Kong. (Photo: Family of Ho Kian-ngiap, third son of Ho Khee-yong) Caption SINGAPORE: Come October 10, 15 iconic Cantonese movies from the 1950s and 1960s will be screened at the National Museum of Singapore. Featuring Hong Kong movie stars of yesteryear such as Patrick Tse Yin and Patsy Kar Ling, it is an 11-day showcase of movies made by Kong Ngee Film Company, which was started by two brothers from Singapore. “Singaporean brothers, Ho Khee-yong and Ho Khee-siang’s pioneering spirit and successful venture into motion picture production placed Singapore on the world map,” said director of the National Museum of Singapore, Angelita Teo. In a statement, the National Museum said, “Kong Ngee Company Limited had its humble beginnings in film distribution in Southeast Asia.” “The company went on to own cinema halls across the region, and in 1955, the Ho brothers made their first foray into filmmaking, under the Kong Ngee Film Company.” it added. Among the 15 films that will be shown in the retrospective are some that were shot in this region, such as “Moon Over Malaya”, which may offer a glimpse of scenes from the past. The movies, with English subtitles, will be screened at the Gallery Theatre at the National Museum of Singapore from October 10-20. Admission is by tickets, and more information can be found at the SISTIC website. – CNA/fa

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